Gratitude

November 24, 2010

By Michael Mark, Creative Director/CEO @ NYCA

Thanks for reading this blog. Just saying thanks makes us feel good.

Here are 465 ways to say thank you. That’s nothing compared to the millions of ways to express the sentiment. Each and every one of them makes everyone in the world happier. Nothing works more productively, consistently, euphorically to make one feel happier than saying and being thanked.

It’s old fashion good business. Even if you text it! Saying thanks is a payment that enriches two ways at once; the receiver gets nourished just as much the giver. Plus it’s 100% tax free!

Future NYCAer, Kamryn

At NYCA, if we have one holiday that captures our spirit it’s Thanksgiving. We sit around the floor, eating pie – you know we are big pie eaters here – and share what we are each thankful for. It’s not about being clever ad people with pithy zingers. Quite the contrary. The room fills with warmth, openness, respect, love, appreciation. Sweet sincerity pie with enough to go around and around.

Thanks again for reading this.


Work where you do your best work.

November 16, 2010

By Michael Mark, CEO/Creative Director @ NYCA

I work at Carl’s Jr. and in my car.

Where do you work? Is it the place you do your best work? Shaking your head, aren’t ya? That’s why we try to stimulate NYCA – with art, flowers, junk food, painting parties, quotes, a grove of trees, questions on the walls. The place is an idea prodder.

I work best in the morning. I tend to wake up before 6 and go hard at it while still in the dream state before the socializing takes over – the daily hygiene, the dressing, and the conversation. By that time, I am normal and less able creativity-wise.

Personally, I love Carl’s Jr. to work. I’m here right now, 6:45pm on Monday. They have great ‘60’s music playing – “Wooly Bully” is on now — and I am tapping with my foot and with my fingers on the keyboard. And there’s electricity here. And carbs and fat. Idea generators.

They have big windows so I can see the world, get the late sun, and be sparked by the people in adjacent booths and t-shirts that say funny things. And I’ve got a big ol’ desk with all the napkins, salt and pepper I could need. And I think, ‘cause of its macho advertising, it doesn’t attract pesky little kids: Paris sliding over a soapy car in a jeweled thong eating a burger is not everyone’s idea of a happy meal. Ooh, “Midnight Train to Georgia” just came on! Love the Pips! That just drives me to come up with something – whoo-oooh!

Which reminds that I also like transportation when I’m working: movement works for me – trains, planes, buses, cars. Maybe I love windows — they help you see outside and in. Maybe because if I can’t get out of my seat, it forces my mind outwards. Maybe it’s the motion that moves me.

Sometimes when I run low on energy, having sucked the place dry, I will move from a Denny’s to Burger King or a McDonald’s to a Panera to tap into a current. Keeps the thinking going.

Anywhere you work best – that doesn’t mean just for yourself but for your team — is the best place to work. Find out what time of day and where and go at it.

Try the fast food joints – they’re full of positive energy – will work even if you’re vegan. Just being near a Happy Meal makes you feel like a kid again. And kids always have ideas.


Change is hard. Wait, no it’s not.

November 9, 2010

By Michael Mark, CEO/Creative Director @ NYCA

At NYCA we have a criteria that our work is only good if it grows the business. We say, “Nothing Matters But grow!” Of course, many other things in life matter but this is a mantra to help us focus and steer clear of the staticky small stuff that can get in the way. Like noise cancelling headphones. It works, but extreme focus can cause rigidity, fear, burnout or repeating a method because it is known, or merely time efficient. We want consistent production of grow! ideas and the benefits and joy that comes with them.

It’s easy to get stuck, trapped emotionally, creatively and fall into a pattern (a pitfall in consistency). This is bad for new ideas, bad for the soul, bad for business.

That’s why change is not only good, it’s a must. They say change is the only constant thing in life and I have heard and know personally how hard it is. But it beats the same every day. So I’m going to try to convince you and myself to stop resisting the inevitable and learn to embrace change, flow with it, even push it along.

1- Change requires deep introspection. That means learning about yourself. Who can be more interesting? So we gotta love that!

2- Change causes internal shifts. Shifts remind you that you’re alive; you can’t argue with life!

3- Change is giving up the known. I love pizza but how many times can I eat it? I discovered sushi many years ago when someone pushed me to it and it’s my favorite now!

4- Change challenges our self-image. I hope I’m better tomorrow than I was today, so thanks, change, for the opportunity!

If I haven’t convinced you of the joy of change think of this: what does it cost you to constantly stay the same? Talk about tense! How does it feel when you have to shut down your own natural energy and desire to stretch, to explore? That’s one person with two mega- forces inside them going against each other! Pepto anyone? How does staying in a rut, going over the same spot, again and again, affect your heart, your mind, your sense of self? I think it’s against the Geneva Convention.

So as we say in the NYCA Seed book each NYCAer gets when they drink the grow! juice (paraphrased to protect the ancient secret code of the NYCAer): Try new things, fail, fall, learn, take a new route to work, go out to a new place to eat, sit in a different spot at the conference table. Reinvent yourself in part and find your authenticity. And never ever be boring! Oh yeah, and grow!


‘Tis the Polling Season: Which Brands Get Consumers’ Votes

November 2, 2010

By Meghan Tetwiler, Brand Planner @ NYCA

On November 2nd consumers across America will take to the polls.  Lately, I can’t help but wonder, “Do brands know, or care, how their core consumers are casting their votes?”  If not, should they?

A recent YouGov Brand study showed that America’s leading brands are favored amongst different consumer groups, notably divided by political partisanship.  Check out the chart below!

*These results are based on an index incorporating consumer impressions of quality, value, satisfaction, overall reputation and willingness to recommend brands to others.

As you can see, registered Democrats deem Google as their #1 brand whereas Republicans deem Fox News as their #1 brand.  Taking into account our increasingly bilateral society, it’s not surprising how Democrats and Republicans’ differences naturally spill over into their purchase decisions.  That said, this is the first time I’ve seen consumers’ favorite brands color-coded, distinctively red or blue.

Rarely do companies choose to focus on the political underpinnings of their consumers’ behaviors.  As in first date etiquette, it’s often seen as an advertising faux pas to blur the lines between branding and campaigning.  Unless a client is on the upcoming election’s ballot, political beliefs should arguably be left outside the office door.  Look at how Target’s decision to contribute to a candidate opposed to gay rights has backlashed; angered protesters and institutional shareholders continue to exploit Target Corp. daily, in effort to deter other businesses from allocating corporate funds into elections.

Problem is, when we’re trying to more completely understand consumers, it’s negligent to leave political beliefs 100% off the docket.  That is, consumers’ political beliefs, anyway.

We marketers share politicians’ ongoing challenge to develop deep-rooted connections that ultimately win peoples’ support.  In today’s ever consumer-centric world, no brand or candidate will win without an in-depth understanding of peoples’ wants and needs.  A lot can be learned from studying how consumers cast their votes.  Think about how telling this top ten chart is, at second glance; it indicates Democrats prefer DIY news/information seeking and Republicans prefer to rely on their trusted sources for news/information.  The example of knowing how consumers fulfill their need to get news and information should help inform the types of tools and resources we advertisers craft.