“I see,” says the blind man.

October 26, 2009

By Michael Mark, creative director & CEO @ nyca

I notice that when I take my glasses off I see more clearly. 

blog picture 10-26Due to my 200/250 vision, without the lenses I need to get much closer to the object in question and  use my other senses to decipher the contents. I will touch it not just to hold it but to receive it through feel, giving me a new perspective, enriching my understanding. And then, when I lean nearer, I will take in the smell, more information, deeper learning. 

Lenses, it seems, both enhance and detract from my naturally limited sight. The wide vista between seeing and attention.

With my glasses set aside on my nightstand, the data comes in from all portals, including sound and taste. Careful on this one. It’s best to know the general makeup of the object before ingestion but my mother’s fish pie is even tastier in the misshapen haze of nearsightedness than under the clinical light of her kitchen. 

When the familiar becomes foreign I instantly see them fresh. It’s a reintroduction and, if I can put my knowledge aside along with my glasses, then I can truly know it again, for the first time.

The opportunity to see things for what they are, not what I knew them to be, works on people, pets, even brands. It’s good for the health of the relationship, wiping out the crud of the past and promoting forgiveness, understanding, love, or at least, acceptance.

I have tried this in the morning, still wobbly with dream to meet the Michael I am that day. Lopsided before the mirror, I lean forehead to forehead with my reflection, and tell myself I look pretty good, lost weight, grown some hair since last I saw me.

I have had glasses on my face for 40 years, every day, every waking hour, traveled around the world, lived with a woman for 30 years in them, raised our kids, written books, ran and started businesses, saw presidents in them.

Amazing to think what I have missed.